Innovate Collaborate Grow

 
 
Faculty & Research

Research Colloquium 2013-2014

Dean Eric R. Spangenberg took the reins at the Merage School on June 1, 2014. As a passionate educator and international scholar, Eric is looking forward to working with the entire Merage School community to continue achieving excellence in business education.

Organization and Management

 

Overview

 

The Organization and Management’s doctoral program is one of the country's most prominent and is consistently recognized as one of the most productive groups of scholars in the world. The Organization and Management area offers broad exposure to theory and research on both organizational behavior and organization theory. Organizational behavior includes topics such as cross-cultural management, power and influence, negotiation, team and interpersonal processes, innovation, trust, organizational commitment, incentives and leadership. Organization theory addresses contemporary theories about organizations and applies them to understand new organizational foundings, growth, adaptation, design, performance, survival and evolution. All doctoral students obtain hands-on experience working on faculty research projects.

 

Course Descriptions

 

MBA Core Classes
     Management of Innovative Organizations
     Organizational Analysis for Management
     Executive Leadership
MBA Electives
     Management of High Technology Companies
     Organizational Change
     Strategic Human Resources Management
     Negotiations
     International Management
     Leadership Strategies
     Communication Skills
     Power In and Around Organizations
     Strategic Communication
     Global Team Collaboration
     Design/Grow Entrepreneurial Organizations
     Misc. OM Elective
     Develop Creative Thinking
     Managing Organizational Networks

 

Course descriptions for the PhD program may be found on the PhD website, and the Undergraduate business classes may be found through UCI’s course catalogue.

 

Faculty

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Christopher Bauman

PhD, University of Illinois at Chicago
Key Areas - Behavioral ethics; corporate social responsibility; diversity; organizational justice; negotiations

 

 

 

 

 

 

Christine Beckman

PhD, Stanford University
Key Areas - Organizational learning and change; entrepreneurship and social entrepreneurship (for-profit and education); social networks and interorganizational networks; organizational growth and survival; technology and communication

 

 

 

 

 

  Newton Margulies (Professor Emeritus)

  PhD, University of California, Los Angeles
  Key Areas - Organizational Change and Development: dealing with organizational

  diagnosis and processes of change.  Exploring the variety of techniques that improve

  organizational effectiveness and teamwork.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Gerardo Okhuysen

PhD, Stanford University
Key Areas - Management of task and environmental uncertainty, conflict in groups, definitions of group success, and the role of the context in group activities

 

 

 

 

 

 

Jone L. Pearce

PhD, Yale University
Key Areas - Organizational behavior; workplace interpersonal processes, such as trust and status, and how these processes may be affected by political structures, economic conditions and organizational policies and practices

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Lyman Porter (Professor Emeritus)

PhD, Yale University
Key Areas - Management education and development;  organizational psychology; human resource management

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 Claudia Bird Schoonhoven

PhD, Stanford University
Key Areas -  Evolutionary dynamics of technology-based firms; innovation; entrepreneurship

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Denis Trapido

PhD, Stanford University
Key Areas - Effects of competition on the formation of social and economic ties;  the origins and rewards of creativity;  and the evolution of professional networks

 

 

For the latest public research in Organization and Management, click here.

 

Visiting & Affiliated Faculty and Researchers

 

 

MBA Core Classes

 

 

200 Management of Innovative Organizations
This course serves to introduce both the managerial job and your MBA program studies.  We discuss fundamental concepts, frameworks, and analytical techniques from organization studies and strategy as complementary tracks of knowledge to initiate you into the concrete challenges that managers in high performing and innovative organizations typically confront.  The course focuses on the role of managers in developing, supporting, and sustaining organizational innovation. To develop and foster innovation requires changing the way managers “do what they do.” You will begin to identify key issues in maintaining innovation and to understand the implementation challenges managers face.  The course introduces different frameworks for analyzing and designing innovative organizations, the foundations of strategy and competitive analysis, innovation as a strategic imperative, alliances and networks as a source of innovation, and key issues in managing innovation.  As an introduction to the MBA program, you will be introduced to the pedagogical methods of case analysis, group problem solving, and oral presentations as a means of developing the skills and strategies associated with effective managerial decision making. We will highlight the different functional areas you will encounter in your core classes. The course also provides an opportunity to get to know a group of people who will be very important to you in the years to come – your fellow students in the program.

202 Organizational Analysis for Management
This course is designed to increase your skill and effectiveness in analyzing and managing organizations, groups, and individuals. The course material will be useful in motivating others, managing relationships with people, making complex decisions, becoming a leader, managing and cultivating innovation, planning careers, improving team effectiveness, and structuring organizations. The course integrates concepts and theories with the practical realities of managing organizations.  Ultimately, the tools and skills developed in this course should equip you to become more effective contributors to organizations that you join by developing your analytic/diagnostic skills.  These skills include the ability to diagnose “real life” management situations and offer sound recommendations to improve learning, innovation, and effectiveness.  The objective is to expose you to basic ideas, some applications of those ideas, and to give you a framework for organizing your own past experience. You will develop several frames or lenses that you can use to guide your future experiences in organizations. The course does not offer you a recipe of what to do but gives you a set of analytic skills and different ways of thinking that can help you address novel problems in organizations that operate in an information-rich environment. Prerequisite:  200.

296 Executive Leadership
Focuses on the conceptual, practical, and personal dimensions of executive leadership. Past and current leadership theories are addressed. Individual personal assessment and diagnosis.

 

MBA Electives

 

  

216 Management of High Technology Companies
High-technology firms face special rewards and risks beyond those faced by other firms. Technological change creates opportunities for new industries and products, but at the same time renders existing firm competencies irrelevant. This course examines how managers can identify competency-destroying technological change, exploit such change for competitive advantage, and maintain capabilities for innovation. The specific focus is on firms that sustain competitive advantage through IT, either as producers of IT-related products or through the use of IT to drive change in other industries.  PREREQUISITES: 210


220 Organizational Change
This course focuses on five aspects of organizational change: 1. The challenge of change 2. The vision of change. The implementation of change 4. Change recipients 5. Change agents In the course, students will evaluate what needs to be changed, what to change to, how to make the change, who will be changing, and who will initiate and monitor the change process. The course uses applied practioner based literature and academic research-based literature to analyze teaching cases and student's own experiences with organizational change. Several teaching cases demonstrate how technology drives change in organizations such as, a company adopting an Internet strategy or a company having to undergo major organizational restructuring due to the adoption of IT in their processes. This course meets the requirements for ITM electives because information technology is one of the strongest drivers of change in organizational life today. In order to successfully implement any IT based strategy, students must be competent at developing change implementation plans that are challenging, visionary and meet the needs of both technology users and those responsible for conducting the change process.

224 Strategic Human Resources Management
This course is an introduction to the theory and practice of managing human resources, with an emphasis on strategic HR planning. The course reviews how firms' HR system choices match various organizational strategies and contribute to firm performance. Topics include the design of staffing, training and development, performance appraisal, and reward systems as well as the evaluation of organizational effectiveness. Special attention is given to the fit of HR systems and firms' competitive strategies. Prerequisites: Mgmt. 200


225 Negotiations
Global conflict, mergers and acquisitions, partnering between competitors, flattening organizational hierarchies, neighborhood and environmental disputes, changing family roles – could there possibly be a better time for developing your negotiation skills? Learning how to negotiate can help you become more professionally and personally effective and improve your relationships with subordinates, peers, patients, bosses, customers, suppliers and family members.  While many of us might be “naturally” good negotiators, everyone can improve their skills through the acquisition of negotiation theories and concepts.  By applying negotiation theories in simulated negotiations you will learn to a) prepare for negotiations, b) analyze different negotiation situations, c) ask for what you want, d) look for integrative, interest-based “solutions”, e) avoid agreeing to bad deals.  The objective of this course is to change the way you negotiate so that you feel comfortable negotiating, can reach better agreements, and can manage conflict.  Prerequisite: Mgmt. 200, 202

228 International Management
Impact of different cultures and political/economic systems on assumptions, expectations and organizational practices relevant to conducting business in different national settings.  Understanding of the challenges of cross-national management and resources utilized to work and conduct business outside the United States. Prerequisite:  Mgmt. 102.

229 Leadership Strategies
This course provides students with insights and perspectives about leadership and how it relates to their career. The course is focused on answering three questions: Where is the student currently as a leader? What are tools the student can use to improve as a leader right now? What is the student’s plan for a future career as a leader? The first goal of this course will be to give students a clear perspective on their assumptions and inclinations as a leader, as well as how others perceive them as a leader. Students will measure and analyze their own leadership style, strengths, and weaknesses and receive feedback about their leadership from people who they have lead. The second goal of this course is to provide students the tools to improve their leadership. We will read and discuss classic, as well as recent, approaches in the academic literature on leadership to understand what they imply for the students’ career. We will focus on techniques and skills that will help them engage and mobilize constituents as a leader – clients and customers, colleagues, and direct reports. For example, the course will address how to adapt one’s leadership depending upon the situation, and how to manage dilemmas that all leaders face. The third goal is to prepare students to take control of their own career by creating an explicit career action plan. The plan will include the data and analysis of their current leadership style and behavior; statements of their aspirations as a leader at work and outside of work; and specific steps to meet challenges starting from the near term future and beyond. Prerequisite:  200, 202.


290 Communication Skills
This 2-unit class is designed to help you communicate more effectively and strategically.  Each of the five sessions will focus on a different communication format or type of communication including group presentations, meetings, one-on-one communication, difficult conversations and problem solving and requests or advocating for oneself.  The goal of this class is to help you learn to develop and deliver messages that strategically address your target and have the impact you want.  Prerequisite:  200.

 

290 Developing Your Creative Thinking Ability

Research suggests that you can learn to think more creatively. This course will be fun – in fact fun and creativity are intimately related – and it will demand concentrated, concerted, consistent effort (kind of like lifting weights to build your muscles – you have to do it on a regular basis and you need to be serious and dedicated).  Because much of the work for this course is done in class, attendance is mandatory. As a result of this class, you will identify new ways of thinking about problems, situations, ideas.  The class will involve weekly exercises to be done outside of class to develop different ways of thinking (not necessarily to develop creativity, but to develop the way of thinking that is needed for thinking creatively) and a quarter-long creative project of your choice.  In class we will do a number of exercises to develop different ways of thinking. This class is applicable for people in a variety of functional areas.  Almost all aspects of organizational life are impacted by the need to “think out of the box” – including managing, marketing, operations, consulting, even finance and accounting. 


290 Power In and Around Organizations
Power and influence processes are ubiquitous in organizational life -- and not just in large companies, nonprofit agencies, and public bureaucracies. Entrepreneurs learn quickly how resources and relationships matter for governance and finance opportunities; political dynamics shape outcomes and careers in investment banks and consulting firms. Effective, successful leaders and managers tap into organizational purpose, politics, and perspectives to attain critical organizational and professional goals. This course focuses on increasing your ability to analyze and utilize power dynamics in organizations. Throughout, the emphasis is on developing your skills in understanding and using power in order to be more effective in your work and your career. The course is also a further opportunity to consider leadership, which "paths to power" you will choose, and how to resolve the inevitable dilemmas and contradictions you will encounter along this path. We will focus on topics such as how managers manage their individual networks, with topics such as informal brokerage, mentoring, and ‘managing up’. We also examine the importance of networks in managing teams and innovation across organizational boundaries.  Prerequisite:  200, Mgmt. 202 (except at discretion of instructor)

290 Strategic Communication
Leadership in organizations is achieved through communication. Failure to communicate effectively and strategically and to solve problems through dialogue can limit your career.  Despite its importance, a great deal of communication in organizations is unclear, misunderstood and lacks strategic focus.  Using experiential exercises, as well as theory, this course will help you learn to communicate strategically when presenting your ideas and when managing up, down, and laterally.  Readings are drawn from a variety of disciplines including management, psychology, communication and sociology.  Course topics include how to understand your communication preferences, present your ideas, communicate effectively via email, lead and participate in meetings, manage conflict, give and receive feedback, improve your listening ability, make choices about which communication medium to use  (face to face, phone, email), improve networking and connecting skills. Students will complete a variety of exercises for class discussion, analyze communication at their place of employment, and complete a course project in which they analyze and improve some aspect of their own work-related communication.

290 Global Team Collaboration
Increasingly, work occurs across organizational, regional, or national boundaries in teams and other collaborative efforts that are enabled by communication technology. Working in these collaborations requires skills in cross-cultural communication, technology use, and dynamic planning and design. This course addresses global collaboration using a multilevel, multidisciplinary, multicultural, and multifaceted approach. Lectures, case studies, exercises and discussions will proceed through a step-by-step examination of a comprehensive model of global collaborations. This model characterizes global collaborations as dynamic systems consisting of: (1) individual-level, collaboration-level, and organizational level inputs; (2) tasks, contexts, and technologies; (3) complex interaction processes; and (4) individual-level, group-level, and organizational level outputs such as creativity, innovation, productivity, financial return, and impact. Readings selected from the disciplines of management, social psychology, sociology, and anthropology will be utilized to gain insight into these various components; readings and cases reflect an international body of literature. Specific attention is given to issues such as who must communicate with whom and how; cross-functional, cross-team, cross-organization, and cross-national interfaces; cultural integration and conflict resolution; building links outside the collaboration to required resources; and technology use. By completing this course, students will: (1) gain greater understanding of the components that comprise global collaborations, (2) learn to identify key factors that influence performance in them, (3) develop skills in diagnosing opportunities and threats that face such collaborations, and (4) gain teamwork expertise by working in complex collaborations and analyzing their own experience in and contributions to them.


290 Design/Grow Entrepreneurial Organizations
Starting a business requires understanding how to locate and recruit talented people, how to manage and keep them, and how to build a high-growth, long-term, sustainable firm. Developing your competencies in organizational design, human resources management, leadership and organizational behavior in the context of a new, small firm.


290 Global Negotiations

This course emphasizes the economic, political, social, and cultural environments of international business negotiations. Topics covered include self-assessment and analysis, environmental analysis, international team building, negotiation processes and strategies, resource analysis, negotiation skill development, pre-negotiation preparations, agreements, and post-contract negotiations. Emphasis is placed on cross-cultural problem solving. Teaching methods are highly interactive include discussion, role playing and lectures.


290 Managing Organizational Networks
Relationships are important to what does (and does not) get done in organizations, but our understanding of organizational networks frequently fails to go beyond this basic recognition.  As a result, networks often are an impediment to realizing our goals rather than a conduit, and managers often make poor choices in how they use networks.  Throughout the course we will examine managers adding value and making mistakes, using the findings of social network analysis to understand managerial action.  This case-based course focuses on how managers manage their individual networks, with topics such as informal brokerage, mentoring, ‘managing up’, and diversity.   We also examine the importance of networks in managing teams and exchanges across organizational boundaries.

 

290 Talent Strategy and Management

While some of you will become human resources (HR) professionals, most of you either currently manage people or will eventually be a leader of people.  No matter what your career entails, you will be required to make thoughtful decisions about and take meaningful action regarding the management of others. You will also be impacted by and required to align employee, team, department and business performance with organizational goals and strategies. This class is for FEMBA students who: 1) are involved in strategic planning for their organizations and need to integrate strategic talent planning and management into a comprehensive business and competitive strategy; 2)  seek to understand the various facets of people and organizational alignment and the implications for organizational effectiveness, performance excellence and management roles and responsibilities; and 3) wish to pursue HR as career, focusing on the strategic as well as managerial implications of this field. This class will involve a variety of learning approaches, including lectures with handouts, class discussions, case study work in small groups, debates, reading assignments, individual self-assessments, guest speakers, out-of-class career experiences, a final exam and papers.

 

290 Performance Management for the 21st Century
This course focuses on providing tangible “toolkits” for those who currently or will soon be managing performance in a diverse, knowledge-based economy. Some of the topics would include performance planning and goal setting, managing a diverse workforce, delivering feedback effectively, and how to conduct more effective performance appraisals.   

 

291 Behavioral and Institutional View of Organizations

(Learning, Networks, BTF, Institutional theory, Social movements) This course introduces students to many of the core theoretical arguments in contemporary organizational theory.  Our first goal is to understand the foundational theories in sociology have shaped organizational studies (i.e., institutional theory, behavioral theory of the firm), and we explore how these theories have evolved (i.e., learning, networks, social movements). We consider how recent advances in theory and research extend these approaches in interesting ways.  Our second goal is to develop your skills for analyzing and developing organization theory.  During the course, you will develop a solid understanding of some of the major economic perspectives guiding the study of organizations and you will examine how different theoretical perspectives are tested.

 

291 Current Debates in Organizational Behavior Theory

As the second in a two-part series, this course extends beyond the foundational theories in organizational behavior, to enable students to develop knowledge of the most recent organizational behavior research published in the mainstream management journals. Coverage will include awareness of:  which issues and theoretical frameworks are currently receiving attention (and those that are not, but perhaps should be), the strengths of recently employed research designs and methodologies (as well as the weaknesses), basic conclusions which can be drawn from recent research (and those which have yet to be evidenced), and implications for practice (as well as gaps in our understanding). Specific selection of topics will rotate each year according to instructor and participant expertise and interest.  Participants will also become familiar with the mainstream management journals, including: editorial missions, foci and domains; submission guidelines; review processes; acceptance rates, reputations, and rankings; strengths and weaknesses.  The overall objective of the course is to gain a greater understanding of what constitutes high quality, impacting, and interesting theory and research in the field, as well as challenges associated with developing such theory and research.  In addition, the seminar is designed to encourage the development of the following skills:  critical thinking about research, expertise in analytical written evaluation of research, group facilitation and discussion techniques, and research framing, planning, and presentation skills.

 

291 Foundations of Organizational Behavior Theory

Organizational behavior is the study of individuals and their relationships when doing organizational work, and organizational processes and practices as they affect individuals and groups. Major topics have traditionally included: individual characteristics such as beliefs, values and personality; individual processes such as perception, motivation, decision making, judgment, commitment and control; group characteristics such as size, composition and structural properties; group processes such as collective cognition, decision making and leadership; organizational processes and practices such as goal setting, feedback, rewards, and behavioral aspects of task design; and the influence of all of these on such individual, group, and organizational outcomes as performance, productivity, turnover, absenteeism, and stress. This course has two purposes. One is to develop is continue to develop doctoral students’ in-depth understanding of several Organizational Behavior (OB) scholarship with an emphasis on individual differences and interpersonal relationships. The topics include critical foundational readings and current debates and discussions. The topics covered in Part I are personality and the person-situation debate, affect, attitudes, interpersonal relationships; and in Part II person organization relationships, power and politics, and student-choice topics. The emphasis will be on developing a rich understanding of the attractions of these ideas to our colleagues, the prominent debates, and an ability to critically analyze and build on the work in these areas. The second purpose is to provide practical experience in the development of questionnaire-based scale measures that validly represent concepts (i.e., "measurement practicum”). Such practical craft knowledge will provide the foundation for evaluating others’ research using self-report measures (the vast majority of the work done in many social science fields), as well as help develop confidence and skill in establishing your own measures.

 

291 Foundations of Organizational Behavior: Part I

Part I & II (2 units each). Organizational behavior is the study of individuals and their relationships when doing organizational work, and organizational processes and practices as they affect individuals and groups. Major topics have traditionally included: individual characteristics such as beliefs, values and personality; individual processes such as perception, motivation, decision making, judgment, commitment and control; group characteristics such as size, composition and structural properties; group processes such as collective cognition, decision making and leadership; organizational processes and practices such as goal setting, feedback, rewards, and behavioral aspects of task design; and the influence of all of these on such individual, group, and organizational outcomes as performance, productivity, turnover, absenteeism, and stress. This course has two purposes. One is to develop is continue to develop doctoral students’ in-depth understanding of several Organizational Behavior (OB) scholarship with an emphasis on individual differences and interpersonal relationships. The topics include critical foundational readings and current debates and discussions. The topics covered in Part I are personality and the person-situation debate, affect, attitudes, interpersonal relationships; and in Part II person organization relationships, power and politics, and student-choice topics. The emphasis will be on developing a rich understanding of the attractions of these ideas to our colleagues, the prominent debates, and an ability to critically analyze and build on the work in these areas. The second purpose is to provide practical experience in the development of questionnaire-based scale measures that validly represent concepts (i.e., "measurement practicum”). Such practical craft knowledge will provide the foundation for evaluating others’ research using self-report measures (the vast majority of the work done in many social science fields), as well as help develop confidence and skill in establishing your own measures.
 

291 Foundations of Organizational Behavior: Part II

Part I & II (2 units each).  Organizational behavior is the study of individuals and their relationships when doing organizational work, and organizational processes and practices as they affect individuals and groups. Major topics have traditionally included: individual characteristics such as beliefs, values and personality; individual processes such as perception, motivation, decision making, judgment, commitment and control; group characteristics such as size, composition and structural properties; group processes such as collective cognition, decision making and leadership; organizational processes and practices such as goal setting, feedback, rewards, and behavioral aspects of task design; and the influence of all of these on such individual, group, and organizational outcomes as performance, productivity, turnover, absenteeism, and stress. This course has two purposes. One is to develop is continue to develop doctoral students’ in-depth understanding of several Organizational Behavior (OB) scholarship with an emphasis on individual differences and interpersonal relationships. The topics include critical foundational readings and current debates and discussions. The topics covered in Part I are personality and the person-situation debate, affect, attitudes, interpersonal relationships; and in Part II person organization relationships, power and politics, and student-choice topics. The emphasis will be on developing a rich understanding of the attractions of these ideas to our colleagues, the prominent debates, and an ability to critically analyze and build on the work in these areas. The second purpose is to provide practical experience in the development of questionnaire-based scale measures that validly represent concepts (i.e., "measurement practicum”). Such practical craft knowledge will provide the foundation for evaluating others’ research using self-report measures (the vast majority of the work done in many social science fields), as well as help develop confidence and skill in establishing your own measures.

 

291 PhD Organizational Theory

A special topics course.

 

291 Ph.D. Sem-OB

A special topics course.

 

291 Ph.D. Sem-OT

A special topics course.


291 Rational, Economic, and Ecological Views of Organizations

(Rational systems, TCE, Agency, Contingency, Resource Dependence, Ecology) This course introduces students to many of the core theoretical arguments in contemporary organizational theory.  Our first goal is to understand the foundational theories in economics and rational systems and to consider how power and ecological views have shaped these theories (i.e., resource dependence, transaction cost economics, organizational ecology, community ecology). We consider how recent advances in theory and research extend these approaches in interesting ways.  Our second goal is to develop your skills for analyzing and developing organization theory.  During the course, you will develop a solid understanding of some of the major economic perspectives guiding the study of organizations and you will examine how different theoretical perspectives are tested.

 

291 Research Seminar in Measurement and Construct Development

Many disciplines within the business school use instruments to operationalize constructs of interest (e.g., innovation, customer satisfaction, conflict orientation, etc.). The purpose of this seminar will be to teach students about the construction and evaluation of measures of constructs (test construction), with particular emphasis on survey methodology.  Thus, the seminar will cover measurement and test construction theory, including reliability and validity. Within the course, students will learn about item analysis, factor analysis, correlation analysis, and structural equation modeling as these quantitative tools are applied to the test construction and evaluation domains.  The seminar will involve relevant readings as well as application of concepts to the student’s own research interests.

 

297F Doctoral Research Methods

Doctoral Research Methods for the Management and Business Social Sciences:  This is a course in the fundamentals of social science research in the management and business fields: theory development research design, methods, data management, and writing scholarly research publications.  It is designed for doctoral students intending scholarly research careers and will involve hands-on practice in formulating hypotheses and designing research to test the participants’ own research ideas, and in conducting journal reviews.  This course seeks to help students to begin developing the skills scholars need to be competent members of their scholarly fields, to complete an important dissertation that will increase the chance of securing interviews at the best schools, and to enable participants to do research that attracts fame and fortune throughout their careers.  Little background in scientific methods or statistics is assumed.