CGL    


Doctoral Courses


Foundations of Organizational Behavior Theory 
The core domain of organizational behavior is the study of individuals and groups within an organizational context, and organizational processes and practices as they affect individuals and groups. Major topics have traditionally included: individual characteristics such as beliefs, values and personality; individual processes such as perception, motivation, decision making, judgment, commitment and control; group characteristics such as size, composition and structural properties; group processes such as collective cognition, decision making and leadership; organizational processes and practices such as goal setting, feedback, rewards, and behavioral aspects of task design; and the influence of all of these on such individual, group, and organizational outcomes as performance, productivity, turnover, absenteeism, and stress.  In this course, we will examine research focusing on the core of organizational behavior, developing an in-depth familiarity with several organizational behavior frameworks that have an extensive history and have also remained prominent over time in our literature (specific selection of classics will rotate each year). The emphasis will be on developing a rich understanding of the attractions of these ideas to our colleagues (i.e., why each of the readings have become classics) as well as the fundamentals of the theories.  We will also pair the classics with recent papers as a basis for discussing how they have been utilized and the quality of the empirical work investigating them. In addition, the seminar is designed to encourage the development of the following skills:  critical thinking about research, expertise in analytical written evaluation of research, group facilitation and discussion techniques, and research framing, planning, and presentation skills.

Current Debates in Organizational Behavior Theory
As the second in a two-part series, this course extends beyond the foundational theories in organizational behavior, to enable students to develop knowledge of the most recent organizational behavior research published in the mainstream management journals. Coverage will include awareness of:  which issues and theoretical frameworks are currently receiving attention (and those that are not, but perhaps should be), the strengths of recently employed research designs and methodologies (as well as the weaknesses), basic conclusions which can be drawn from recent research (and those which have yet to be evidenced), and implications for practice (as well as gaps in our understanding). Specific selection of topics will rotate each year according to instructor and participant expertise and interest.  Participants will also become familiar with the mainstream management journals, including: editorial missions, foci and domains; submission guidelines; review processes; acceptance rates, reputations, and rankings; strengths and weaknesses.  The overall objective of the course is to gain a greater understanding of what constitutes high quality, impactful, and interesting theory and research in the field, as well as challenges associated with developing such theory and research.  In addition, the seminar is designed to encourage the development of the following skills:  critical thinking about research, expertise in analytical written evaluation of research, group facilitation and discussion techniques, and research framing, planning, and presentation skills.

Behavioral and Institutional View of Organizations (Learning, Networks, BTF, Institutional theory, Social movements)
This course introduces students to many of the core theoretical arguments in contemporary organizational theory.  Our first goal is to understand the foundational theories in sociology have shaped organizational studies (i.e., institutional theory, behavioral theory of the firm), and we explore how these theories have evolved (i.e., learning, networks, social movements). We consider how recent advances in theory and research extend these approaches in interesting ways.  Our second goal is to develop your skills for analyzing and developing organization theory.  During the course, you will develop a solid understanding of some of the major economic perspectives guiding the study of organizations and you will examine how different theoretical perspectives are tested.

Rational, Economic and Ecological Views of Organizations (Rational systems, TCE, Agency, Contingency, Resource Dependence, Ecology)
This course introduces students to many of the core theoretical arguments in contemporary organizational theory.  Our first goal is to understand the foundational theories in economics and rational systems and to consider how power and ecological views have shaped these theories (i.e., resource dependence, transaction cost economics, organizational ecology, community ecology). We consider how recent advances in theory and research extend these approaches in interesting ways.  Our second goal is to develop your skills for analyzing and developing organization theory.  During the course, you will develop a solid understanding of some of the major economic perspectives guiding the study of organizations and you will examine how different theoretical perspectives are tested.